The Cathedral Vidhya School, Lonavala at Times Prestigious Schools Exhibition

Educationista – An unique platform that connects schools with the parent community and guide/counsel the parents with detailed information on school education.

Educationista is committed to suggest parents with Quality Residential Schools that provide a school away from Home, nurturing children in their early days with values, culture and most importantly discipline.

Residential schools require students to take part in residential activities and live together throughout this journey. Even during a short period of time this can result in improvements in social abilities of each child that will be developed.

hhh
It is Teamwork, that makes students understand their peers, ask questions to make sense of their own understanding, help others, be more accepting of each other, provide reasons for their ideas and share knowledge. These skills later used in the classroom environment can enable them to increasingly focus on their own learning and learn from their peers as well as teachers.

Therefore, Residential Schools tries to process the improvement of the them through teamwork and communication, that will also help contribute towards meeting the curriculum through providing skills valuable for experiences later in life.

Positive social relationships between peers is acknowledged to contribute towards children’s overall well-being and grounding for later in life which can off course aid their learning journey. Having a positive relationship with a teacher also provides increased motivation for pupils to learn.

A strong community spirit is vital for a harmonious environment not only in school, but can also develop behavioural improvements in children at home. This is a result of them finding security, stability and confidence within their school community.

Community spirit also evokes a sense of belonging to each one of us.

All residential schools have a positive impact on social development which contributes towards classroom success and learning opportunities.

Why Cathedral Vidya school?
logoThe Cathedral Vidya School – where world class education, sports and cultural activities together endeavor to create an environment, truly conducive to the development of young lives. An amalgamation of academic proficiency, professional sports, exposure to the world of music and dance and the sheer genius of arts and crafts, Cathedral Vidya School, Lonavala offers a platform where your child is carefully nurtured and mentored towards becoming a truly global citizen. As an institution of high repute, they share their concern and passion about giving your children the best possible education and guidance towards following their dreams of becoming successful individuals in their respective fields.

They offer a diverse range of academic, as well as non-academic options. After complete and thorough understanding of your child’s interest and excellence, they offer the best suited path for your child in the later years in school. The syllabus, sports, extra-curricular activities like music and arts have been given careful consideration and planning. Our teachers and mentors are selected after a stringent process to ensure that only the best facilitators play a part in the vocation of your child.

They compromise on nothing, when it comes to offering the best facilities and environment. From the airy and well equipped classrooms, to the comfortable and well-appointed suites for our boarding students, to the vast fields for sports like football and volleyball, to the double storied library for young minds, they have with deliberation and due diligence in setting up every little detail.

They literally bring the world to your children and prepare them for achieving the goals that they would reach out for, on stepping into the world. They take your children on the path of success and show them the way to reach their destination.

Cathedral Vidya school (Lonavala) is coming to Educationista ‘Times Prestigious Schools Admission Fair’ across 8 states and 13 exhibition all across India.

For more info:
Call +91 9820024991
Visit: http://bit.do/FBReg

Advertisements

School Systems Around The World!

Ever thought what school life in countries around the world is like? How do the disciplinarian Koreans teach their kids in difference to an individualist culture like, say, the Finns?  As an educator we aim of improving teacher – parent communication, it is kind of our task to do so. So, we put together a list of countries with some key informations:

It’s fair to say there are distinguished differences in academic systems around the world. Henceforth it is no surprise there is a massive gap in achievements of each system of education. A short analysis of each top-class program begins to reveal common threads that are shared between nations with regard to teaching advantage. Before we start to look at every single nation, it is important to know how the nations are ranked and what measures is used to draw conclusions about ranking.  One such organization that organises annual comparisons and completes analysis is the Centre on International Educational Benchmarking. The measures they use for determining academic standing includes student scores on the PISA assessment in Math, Reading and Science. Other aspects taken into account when determining rank include graduation rate, teacher training, funding spent per student, and continuing education past the compulsory mandates. Let’s explore some of the top performers to discover what they are doing right.

Singapore:

Top in the list is Singapore, for producing the most solid results on student valuations worldwide.  The development of the student is embedded in a teacher dominated classroom hierarchy where the curriculum is practiced and drilled toward the goal of producing high test scores. Grade levels and classes are connected for smooth and meaningful relaying of information.

singapore-schools

Here are some interesting facts about Singaporean education system:

  • Time spent in school each year is divided into two semesters (Jan-May & July-Nov).  The typical school day begins at 7:50 am and ends at 1:15pm. Schools run 171 days yearly.
  • Students are cheered to develop beyond the classroom during the break from formal education by taking trips and engaging in compulsory activities to expand knowledge and promote interests/talents.
  • According to Quora.com the average fee per student is $8,900/primary level and $11,900/secondary.
  • Young children are trained to read using the shared “Big Book” approach where the teacher guides the group through the use of oversized books and demonstrating.
  • Teachers make an average of $52,700 USD per annum.
  • Singapore also has religious schools, Madrasah’s, which offer mix programs of both secular and religious teaching. The religious classes are also taken to the national curriculum and students take the same national tests as their non-madrasah taught peers.

Hong Kong:

Hong Kong shows us a stiff philosophy behind the success of its educational system as well. They employ an “all business” attitude with strict observance to compliance and achievement. Hong Kong has long been criticized for failing to cheer creativity and the exchange of ideas in place of “teaching to the test”, where the outcome on the tests are more important than the actual development of the student through open ended learning.

hongkong

Some interesting facts about Hong Kong education system:

  • The typical school day in Hong Kong starts at 7:55 am and ends at 1:45 pm.  Many schools are forced into a half day program or two rounds per day due to the number of students. In schools where the students are only able to go half day, they must have to attend every other Saturday also.
  • Students must wear uniforms to school and teachers are strict disciplinarians.
  • There are 190 teaching days per academic year with a summer break running from the end of June to Sept 1.
  • There are 12 years on the educational ladder.
  • The average salaries of the teachers are $36,000-$84,000/annually depending on years teaching and level being taught.
  • The education system in Hong Kong is highly influenced by the British education system.

South Korea:

The South Korean education system has the same beat as its other Asian neighbours with a stiff performing school system. The powerful nature of the schools produces top students but within a framework of limited flexibility.  As the Korean Saying “Teachers are as high as God”. As the Korean saying goes, “teachers are as high as God”. Teachers rule the roost with a secure hand and are extremely respected in the Korean culture.  Families take great pride in education.  Education associates to high status in the South Korean culture.

South Korea Olympiad
South Korean students compete during a Korea Olympiad in Informatics in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, July 17, 2009. 360 elementary, middle and high school students participated in this competition. The 12 winners will attend in the International Olympiad in Informaticsin 2010 in Canada. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

South Korean education system:

  • The annual cost per student is $7,652.
  • The school year runs from March to February. Formal education for the day takes place between 8 am – 4 pm for younger students and 8 am to 9 pm for older students.
  • Most students stay later into the evening after the classroom lessons are finished to take part in additional activities. They even eat their dinner at school sometimes.
  • Along with their 13 hour school day, South Korean high schoolers also attend private, after school tuition, Hagwon to be precise. Students spend almost 16 hours a day learning, not to mention they also attend class on Saturdays!
  • One of the most important characteristics of the South Korean educational system is that teachers are necessary to rotate to a different school to teach every five years.  This is a compulsory practice.  Principals and Vice Principals are also required to move from school to school using a lottery system.
  • Students wear their “school slippers” when inside the building and are required to help clean the school and grounds.
  • The salary for a mid-career level teacher in South Korea is $52,600USD per annum.

Japan:

Japan falls in line with the other top performing Asian school systems as far as student achievement, but pays a more technology savvy based approach. Japan’s current education system has its origins in the American model of 6+3+3+4, with many more components are taken from Europe and appropriated the Japanese way. Students clean their study environment, including the toilets, from elementary school age. With pupils from years above usually taking charge of the juniors in groups, they learn help and support of the foundation of Japanese hierarchical culture. Punctuality is a big deal in Japan, as is in education. Teachers and parents are involved in constant contact and are updated daily, delay of even 5 minutes is not to be tolerated and mostly the school staff assume something had gone wrong, rather than snoozing. Parents are very involved in their child’s education and many volunteer for a variety of tasks from security to supervision or other curriculum activities.

Facts about Japanese Education System:

  • Japanese children must learn over 2,400 symbols in order to be able to read & write
  • Formal education for the day takes place from 8:30 am to 3 pm each day, with some additional attendance on alternating Saturdays.  After 3 pm, the students then attend extra- curricular activities for further self- development.
  • Cost per student in Japan is $9500 yearly.  Students attend year round with the months of August and January off.
  • Japan has an impressive 99% literacy rate nationwide.
  • The average teacher salary in Japan is $45,500USD/annually.
  • There are 1,338,854 teachers in Japan (2013, MEXT.go.jp)
  • The school year begins in April, ending in March the following year.
  • 6 years of preschool education is followed by 3 years of Junior High and High school, also often joint into 6 years. Education is compulsory until graduation from Junior High school. University programs generally last 4 years.

Finland:

Finland is where we begin to see a huge shift in educational philosophy. Finland is more interested in the development and respect of the individual student. Teachers downplay any practice of competition and cultivate an environment of creativity and self-expression. Test scores are not the end all and be all of student success. This style came about in the 1980’s, when Finland realised they had a serious problem with their education as their reducing industry dependent on forestry was started to cause economic problems. Finland’s education system began with elevating the status of teachers.

poster_finland

In fact, Finland is introducing another education reform. By the year 2020, Finland will introduce “teach by topic” method, concentrating on specialised learning programs, along with traditional subject learning like maths and science.

Some facts about the education system in Finland:

  • In Finland, the school day starts at 9-9:45 am and runs until 2-2:45pm Monday-Friday.
  • Students mention to teachers by their first name.
  • By age 13, most Finns speak three or four foreign languages.
  • There are no school uniforms and no shoes for the most part. Only a ½ hour of homework is allocated each day. The atmosphere is relaxed and non-competitive.
  • Children keep the same teacher for 6 years in a row which boosts a solid relationship based on consistency where the teacher has an opportunity to learn and address the needs of each student.
  • Least class hours per week in the developed world.
  • Decentralised system means over 320 municipalities have control over the way they teach in schools, not the government at the top.

Switzerland:

Unique to the country of Switzerland is an educational system rooted in local autonomy. All decisions as to how the schools function within a specific canton (geographic area) rests with local government, much like their Finnish counterpart. The funding is also the requirement of local cantons and differs significantly from one area to another.

switzerland

Some interesting facts about educational system of Switzerland:

  • Typical cost per student is $15,500 (varies by canton)
  • There are 26 separate systems within the country.
  • Produced 113 Nobel Prize & 9 Nobel Peace Prize winners.
  • Teacher’s salary starts at a huge $98,000/yr. For a first year teacher. Teachers complete a 5 year program and are assessed on moral, psychological, intellectual, knowledge and professional qualities before securing a teaching position.
  • The basic school day runs for 2 ½ hours in the morning and 2 hours in the afternoon.  This schedule presents challenges for working parents, although mothers usually do not work outside the home once they are married with children.
  • After the compulsory 11 years of education, 2/3’s of the students select to attend a vocational program w/internship opportunity. This option has created a highly skilled workforce in the country.
  • Home to world famous scientific research institutions and laboratories like CERN, EMPA and Paul Scherrer Institute.

Netherlands

What country wouldn’t want to be able to boast they have the “happiest kids in the world”? According to the Dutch Review, happy children are a by-product of the relaxed culture and philosophy. Dutch children enjoy an educational experience that is not based in competition and demanding milestones or exams. Known within the Dutch culture is the importance of play in the development of the child. The Dutch system presents a great deal of choice with regard to the paths a student might choose to follow.

netherland

Facts:

  • Average fee per student is $10,500.
  • Children attend Monday-Friday from 8:30am to 3pm with an hour break for lunch.
  • Government funded system that asks for parental helps when possible.
  • There is a great amount of versatility with regard to types of schools. The Netherlands has 2/3 more private schools than public schools and many are based on religious or specialized concepts. It is a parental decision as to which school a child will attend and often there are waiting lists for entrance to particular schools.
  • Children start their school experience at age 5 and must attend until age 16 on a full time basis. At age 16, they are then required to attend a minimum of 2 days a week until the age of 18 when they receive their diploma.
  • This relaxed system is totally different to the Asian models, although productivity and earning power of the country remains constantly high minus the stressful formative years in school.
  • An interesting fact to note is the creation of 22 “Steve Jobs Schools” in 2014.  These school are technology based and teachers act as coaches and guides for the students as they self-direct their own learning.
  • The average salary of a mid-career teacher is $61,100 annually in Holland. There is significant difference in salary throughout the country.

Canada:

Canada has a system that also provides for a great deal of teacher autonomy. Each state is responsible for the education of its youth and therefore, there is a lot of difference between provinces. The Canadian population has the highest percentage of citizens with a college degree, coming in at 51% holding a Bachelor of Science or higher.

canada

Some interesting facts:

  • Children starts schooling at age of 5 and attend until they are 18 years old, although they may lawfully quit at age 16.
  • The school year is 190 days long with a Monday-Friday schedule. The day begins at 8:30 am and runs until 2:30/3:30 depending on age level. There is no instruction on Saturdays or Sundays and children are cheered to participate in extra-curricular activities. Children are given no or very little homework up until the age of 10.
  • Cost per student average $11,800 yearly is funded on the local level, not by the federal government. Decisions about everything relating to the schools including hiring practices, curriculum, safety etc. Is determined by the superintendent and a school board for a particular province.
  • Home prices are said by the geographic proximity to “good” schools. Basically, schools that have a good reputation and are highly sought after, create an environment where the homes nearby raise higher values.
  • Teachers hold a minimum of a BS degree although some provinces require a Master’s level certificate. Parents are highly encouraged to become involved in the classroom in the capacity of “teacher assistants”.
  • Pupils are tested at the end of grade 8 for relative intelligence and then guided towards a proper path.
  • Average teacher salary of all provinces is $49,400 annually with Alberta offering the highest wages at $58,500 per year for a new teacher.

Teachers are the strong basis upon which everything else rests. Teachers are extremely respected and lead youth through their formative years toward meaningful goals.

Sources

Image Courtesy

Is boarding school a good idea?

It is a very old question, maybe a dilemma, of whether to admit a child into boarding school or not.
banner_avs5.jpg
Helps develop confidence

Experienced ‘boarders’ are divided on the issue, though not equally. A majority have reflected on boarding life during their younger days as one of the reasons for their successes in life – organisational skill at their workstations, independent decision-making capability, and the ability to work with others, leadership personality and so on.

Can be traumatising, if bullied

But the smaller voices cannot be ignored. Boarding life can be traumatising, depending on the environment. After the lights are turned off, stories abound of ghosts and ghouls tracing paths across the corridor. Also, the Stories about EERR sound in the middle of the night. Dangerous pranks one may call these but for some it can leave behind fears that may last a lifetime. However, the real trouble is when older students gang up and turn bullies. Weaker ones or loners are the usual targets, they are asked to do every day jobs and stand on their heads, sometimes literally, to please the rivals. To some ex- ‘boarding-schoolers’ such treatment, they say, gave them confidence to face up to anything as they grew into adults. Oddly, some parents insist that their children go through the same ‘hard’ experiences that they did, bullying and all and hence opt for boarding school.

Why boarding school?

1runningblinkie_2560-hr_wxcnrtd.jpg

While the jury may be out on the benefits and the demerits of boarding school, one must first question the need for boarding school. Why must a child be put in boarding school? Or, why does a situation arise for boarding school? For a start, parents must give consideration to the quality of education that they are getting presently and weigh it against a potential school elsewhere, where it is perceived or established that the standard of education is higher. Elsewhere, can be anywhere in the world, as is the case with students travelling overseas for college education.

But in the case of a school, where the age of the child is such that she or he is highly impressionable and vulnerable, it is important to assess the schooling and residential environment earlier. More importantly, the child must develop a comfort level with the school before any decision is made.

The closer home, the better

Most boarding schools restrict parents from visiting the students often, but it is a good idea to allow parents to meet the child as often as they wish to, without venturing to take the child out of campus. This way, the routine or discipline is unaffected and at the same time, the child is not left feeling distressed or emotionally low on account of the disturbance of moving out of the comforts of home and into a boarding school knowing that parents are close at hand.

So this brings into perspective, how far really must your boarding school of choice be from your hometown? Experts believe that an overnight journey is the longest you should take to get to your child’s school. International Community School, Governing Council member and experienced counsellor, Edwin David believes, ‘the very fact that your parents can get here the next morning, is reassuring.’ He adds, ‘In a medical emergency too, the presence of parents sooner than later, can be the turning point.’

A balanced scorecard

Should a boarding school get rated only on the quality of education (widely understood as expertise in academics) or should it be measured on a balanced scorecard? Academics Advisor at ICS and expert educator, Cynthia Mulley states, ‘A range of developmental activities is a must. The school must possess adequate play and recreational area and agenda. ‘The after-school hours activity must more than match what one may get as a day-scholar? ‘In those households, where the mother is a homemaker, the after-school daily routine for the child is pretty much in place – wash and change, a snack, games in the neighbourhood park, a hot bath, some reading exercises, dinner, a bit of homework and revision, a glass of milk and then to bed! Boarding school must provide the very routine that homes with both parents working, cannot afford to carry out.’

Television takes over until one or both parents return… Boarding school fills this gap with a daily routine that keeps the child occupied, mentally and physically. ‘The child must be tired, but highly enriched when she or he climbs into bed, each night. It is up to us to make sure they have a full day,’ concludes Ms Mulley.

Health and hygiene

20150202064950411.jpg

The importance of health and hygiene cannot be ignored. ‘High sanitary standards are topmost,’ says Dr Gita Jayaram, ICS Governing Council member and family health expert. ‘Good habits like washing hands before a meal, after games and after classes is a must. Especially, a germ has a way of travelling unseen and suddenly into the mouth or nose.’ Parents must look at the drinking water source and even the cutlery provided by the school. A visit to the school kitchen may also not be out of place,’ she shares.

Interview the dormitory-in-charge

You must get a comfortable feeling about the dorm parent. Is this the person going to meet your child’s expectations, emotionally? A child develops a lifetime bond or lifelong aversion as the case may be, to the dorm parent/matron. ‘When choosing a boarding school,’ says Mr David, ‘it is important to pay particular attention to the personality of the individual that is entrusted with the care of your child. Communication skill must be of highest standards. If the dorm parent is trained in child psychology, then you are in for a long term and mutually positive association. She or he must also be a disciplinarian – no question of bullying or intimidation or rules-breaking on her watch. So it will take a kindly disposition but a firm attitude to make a good matron or dorm-in-charge. Identify this fine combination in the individual.’

A progressive boarding school is careful about who they hire for this vital position!

Of course, the smaller the school, the better. Small schools be liable to personalize their efforts much more effectively than larger boarding schools can. The more homely the boarding atmosphere, the greater the chances of your child faring well during this critical journey of early education.

Source

Image courtesy

Benefits of being in an International school!

Studying in international boards open the chances around the world for your child.  It’s the latest trend that has engulfed parents – to enroll their wards in an international board.

different-cultures-nationalities-children-300x236

International boards have picked up great impression in the last few years. Parents want to give their kids an overall education and expect these schools to give their students individual attention to achieve the same. The faculty appointed to teach these students also go through an aggressive training program to make the cut. It helps to improve our education system to match international standards.

Here are few pros of studying in international schools that offers children something more than just basic education.

Well-equipped classrooms:

International schools mostly have well-furnished classrooms, library, audio-visual aids, laboratories, sporting facilities, art studios, etc. this makes learning more fun and interactive. Those who have problems with poor retaining or concentration capacity fare better due to advanced teaching methods. Limited number of students in every classroom makes it easier for teachers to give proper attention to all.

Diversity:

kiddos.jpg

It’s one of the most exclusive and most required advantages of joining an international school and it’s not just about mastering the English language. At a young age, children are exposed to so many different cultures of the world. Children get a viewpoint of what happens on a day-to-day basis in the lives of people in the world. It exposes them to their problems, social customs, traditions and practices. Even the shift in the dialect people use creates a permanent impression on young minds that go a long way to develop a better cultural understanding.

Languages:

Besides a cultural unification of so many new ideas, one is also exposed to different languages. Fact says that children adapt new languages best during their childhood. When you listen to a foreign language or other local languages, it is grasping into your everyday conversation.

Curriculum:

International boards expose their students to a healthy learning. It’s not about hit the text books, but a practical knowledge of things which helps a child analyse what he learns and put it to use in their day-to-day life. You can study things you read to pass that final exam, but being able to use what you study is an advantage that International boards give you. Also, International boards, boost critical thinking, which is recognizing in colleges and school around the world. Students studying in International schools have the one step ahead when it comes to admissions in colleges universally.

Exposure:

Besides learning and cooperating with others from diverse cultures, international schools also invest a lot of time and money in extracurricular activities. They make sure that children are represented internationally and given the chances to participate in competitions. Sports like football, chess, cricket, swimming, basketball etc. are important part of the wholesome learning. IB schools try to prepare children in all dimensions, so that it adds value to their future lives.

Teaching methodology: 

Teachers are recruited by global schools and are professionally proficient who are aware of the procedure adopted in foreign countries. Schools often send them to seminars and workshops where their knowledge gets updated. While average schools follow the exam pattern of study, global schools concentrate more on practical learning. Students are given assignments and projects and calculated on the basis of that. This form of calculation is good for students who are considered as weak due to poor performance in exams. Such a system inspires critical thinking much more than the concept of learning by habit. Students who are motivated towards research or practical learning find such schools a better option.

Image courtesy : Google.com
Article: midday

How To Be A Good Role Model For Your Child?

Do you want to teach values in your child but do not know how to get started? Do you know a child’s behaviour is an image of that of his parent? Yes, you read it right! While you may protect your child from the negative impacts of the big bad world outside, your temperamental behaviour may encourage your child to turn a bully!

b9b0724d62aa4f2f8e2aa2d2e09b3f74

Being a good parent means being a good role model. Parents are the main positive role models for children. They influence his behaviour, personality, thinking, actions, reactions, values, fitness, lifestyle, etc. Are you keen to become the subject of your child’s inspiration and admiration? These simple steps to turn a perfect role model for kids! Want to know more? Read on!

Steps To Be A Good Role Model For Your Child:

1. Involvement:

Find out ways to connect with your child. Do activities together like playing a sport, discussing a television show, or preparing a meal. These activities will give you a chance to spend some quality time with your children. You may face difficulty in finding time from your busy schedule. However, you need to invest time to make a bond that will last you a lifetime. Include your children in family discussions. Ask them to share their opinion about the family’s rules, decisions and expectations.

2. Practice What You Preach:

Try to practice what you preach. Children, particularly teenagers, notice when you don’t follow home rules. You may teach your child, not to hit others and yet give him a spanking as a punishment. By doing so, you may end up giving mixed signals and confusing your child.

3. Healthy Habits:

Teach healthy lifestyle habits in your child by eating well and regularly exercising. Do not make negative comments about your body and appearance in front of your children. Encourage them to be physically active so that they enjoy good health as they grow up.

4. Respect:

Show respect and kindness to other people, be it young or old. Parents who disrespect others in front of their children are in a way teaching their children that other people are not important. If you want your child to respect you and others, then respect your child first. Teach all the members of the family to treat each other with respect.

5. Admit Your Mistake:

Role models are also humans. Do not lose heart if you see yourself making mistakes. Admit your mistake, learn from it and strive to better yourself. Do not blame anything or anyone. Getting upset or angry will encourage your child to respond to his problems, in the same way.

6. Display Strong Values:

Understand that children experience various problems related to their personality, genetics, peers, upbringing, school, community, etc. The ethical and empathetic behaviour of parents can inculcate values that can counteract all the negative influences of press, media, and internet on children.

7. Problem Solving Skills:

As a child grows, he needs guidance on a variety of issues. Parents can share their personal experiences and decision-making skills with their children. Use problem-solving skills to deal with the conflicts in a productive way. By addressing problems in your life, you can encourage your child to address his concerns and conflicts confidently and independently.

You need to be watchful of your words and actions with your children around. Think, act and talk in a positive way.

We hope these tips help you become the perfect role model for kids.

Please share your advice with us!!

Sources: http://www.momjunction.com/articles/steps-to-turn-into-a-perfect-role-model-for-your-child_00326829/
Image courtesy: http://www.google.com

Myths About Boarding Schools!

Sending children to Boarding schools are a custom that many families in India tend to follow. However, actual knowledge about boarding school always tends to be covered and some parents tend to use it as a threat for children who are naughty or performing poorly academically.

Here is a list of common myths about boarding schools:

1. Boarding schools are only for naughty kids

angryboy_main-420x0

Most troubled children get threatened with being sent to boarding school. Boarding schools are actually populated with children whose parents have jobs that require them to move a lot or parents who feel like their children are mature enough to handle the rigours of boarding school. A boarding school is like any other school, except the students who tend to study there also live on the school premises itself.

2. Dormitories are like prisons

5_8_2013_08_51_11_lcp4eo3q9q52r4q7ls2d4u6ok0_4np7j3c0j

Most certainly not. Most dormitories are welcoming places populated with children and bed and their various Knick knacks. Yes, children do have study hours and have to go to sleep at a certain time but the only places that tend to be locked are the doors which lead into the dormitory.

3. Students in boarding school do not have fun

adorable-angry-kid-girl-sweet

Students in boarding school do have fun. And sometimes, they have more fun than day scholars do because there is no chance of them being alone, not when they stay with their friends and in some cases, even room with them. In fact, when day scholars and boarding school students study together, it is the day scholars who need to work harder to fit in to boarding school culture, sometimes even feeling left out because they do not have the opportunities that residential students do.

4. It’s all about studying and you won’t fit in

1f24ebb6142b6027818c4999635fc635

Boarding school children study just as much as the average day scholar does. In fact the children in a boarding school are no different from children in a normal school. The portrayal of boarding schools in media tends to be skewed. Before you join a boarding school, or want to enroll your child in one, visit the campus of the school. You will be surprised by how warm and welcoming the place is.

5. There is lot of homework and it is difficult

homework

While a boarding school will follow a certain curriculum, it does have a curriculum that extends beyond the one that traditional day schools follow. Boarding schools not only focus on studies, but on sports, extracurricular activities, holistic development etc. A student’s day is not only filled with classes, but also with sports, field trips, excursion etc. Students are given homework in accordance to the curriculum the school follows.

6. Diversity is rare at boarding schools

b32a69107a27a2aa625d7bf8b52e707a

Wrong. Boarding schools are melting pots of diversity. Of course, you will find that the majority of students might be from the same state or country the boarding school is situated in, but students come from far and wide to join boarding schools. It is not unusual to have several multinational students within a boarding school.

7. It will be hard to keep in touch with the family.

FamilyExaminer

Boarding school students and their families are privileged in that with the advances in communications, it’s much easier than ever to stay connected. Most of the boarding schools these days have a weeks’ vacation every three months so that the children do not get homesick.

Do you think we’ve missed out on something? Give your response in the comments section!

Source: http://theteachersdigest.com/8-myths-about-boarding-schools-busted/

Image Courtesy: google.com

Most Popular Boarding Schools In India

The decision to send your child to a boarding school can be a hard one. But the long term benefits of it are sure to make a deep impact on his career and life. Children basically learn to be disciplined and focused by studying in a boarding school. They learn to take responsibility and away from the home environment, they can focus on academics. In a boarding school, stress is laid on the all-round development of the child. He is taught to be a good team player and get ready to take on the challenges of life. Children that pass out from boarding schools are better at adjusting to all kinds of situations.

Let’s take a look at some of the most famous boarding schools in India:

The Doon School, Dehradun, Uttarakhand

doon-school1

A boy’s only boarding school that needs very little introduction. With a student child ratio of 1:10 admission to this prestigious school is a tightrope for even the brightest children in this country

Mayo College, Ajmer, Rajasthan

Ajmer-Mayo-College

Again a boy’s only boarding school that offers facilities’ like museums to armory sections to social development skills. You name it they have it

Bishop Cotton School, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh

1

It is one of the oldest boarding schools in all of Asia. It is a premier institution in North India. There are programs for rock climbing and mountaineering on offer too.

Rishi Valley School, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh

rishi-valley-school-horsleyhills

A co-education school that lays extra stress on learning and academics. Located in a prime location, the school has a long list of celebrities who passed put from here.

St. John’s International Residential School, Chennai

St.-John's-International-Residential-School-1

A modern age co-education school that offers air conditioned hostels and top-notch facilities to all its students.

Welham Girls School, Dehradun, Uttarakhand

welham-girls

You have to register your child at birth in order to get a fair chance at admission in this prestigious school. Students who pass out from this all-girls school have been known to have achieved great fame and laurels in life.

The Scindia School, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

The-Scindia-School-Gwalior-Madhya-Pradesh

The high end IT facilities of this school are world class. With 12 massive hostels on the campus the school has along standing unmatched reputation

The Daly College, Indore, Madhya Pradesh

Daly-College

This co-ed school has built a solid reputation for itself in the last decade or so. Children who pass out from this school are confident to take on all that might come their way

St. Paul’s School, Darjeeling, West Bengal

maxresdefault

Darjeeling is world famous for its boarding schools for both boys and girls. An all boy’s school that has set a benchmark in high standards in education.

Sarala Birla Academy, Bangalore, Karnataka

690_SaralaBirlaAcademy

One of the top schools in Karnataka, that even houses a 18 bed hospital on its campus. Admissions are made on the basis of an entrance test that is followed by an interview.

source- http://topyaps.com/n-most-popular-boarding-schools-in-india
image courtesy- google.com